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28th Napa Pain Conference Sessions

Variations, Innovations & Integrative Collaborations




Credits: None available.

Standard: $59.95

Description

Variations, Innovations & Integrative Collaborations


Target Audience

Clinical researchers, clinician scientists, academicians, and administrators engaged in, conducting, or supporting medical research.


Abstract

Collaboration is often a critical aspect of scientific research, which is dominated by complex problems, rapidly changing technology, dynamic growth of knowledge, and highly specialized areas of expertise. An individual scientist can seldom provide all of the expertise and resources necessary to address complex research problems5.

Collaboration among professionals from varied backgrounds and with varied occupational experiences may help to promote scientific innovation by broadening perspectives. In addition, a range of professional experiences may enable individuals to solve difficult research questions more easily by themselves6.


Learning Objectives

As a result of participating in this activity, learners will be better able to:

  • apply an improved understanding of immune dysfunction that occurs with age to the treatment of patients with chronic conditions
  • leverage interdisciplinary collaboration when solving clinical or scientific problems

Accreditation & Designation

Release date: This activity was released 8/27/2021.

Termination date: The content of this activity remains eligible for CME Credit until 8/26/2024, unless reviewed or amended prior to this date.

Neurovations Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Neurovations Education designates this Other (blended learning) activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.


Desirable Physician Attributes

  • Medical Knowledge [ACGME/ABMS] about established and evolving biomedical, clinical, and cognate (e.g. epidemiological and social-behavioral) sciences and the application of this knowledge to patient care
  • Employ Evidenced-based Practice [IOM] Integrate best research with clinical expertise and patient values for optimum care, and participate in learning and research activities to the extent feasible
  • Systems-Based Practice [ACGME/ABMS] as manifested by actions that demonstrate an awareness of and responsiveness to the larger context and system of health care and the ability to effectively call on system resources to provide care that is of optimal value

Additional Reading

  1. Tuttle, K. R. (2020). Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on clinical research. Nature Reviews Nephrology, 16(10), 562-564.
  2. George, G., Lakhani, K. R., & Puranam, P. (2020). What has changed? The impact of Covid pandemic on the technology and innovation management research agenda. Journal of Management Studies, 57(8), 1754.
  3. Rodrigues, M. L., Nimrichter, L., & Cordero, R. J. (2016). The benefits of scientific mobility and international collaboration. FEMS microbiology letters, 363(21).
  4. Root-Bernstein, B., Siler, T., Brown, A., & Snelson, K. (2011). ArtScience: integrative collaboration to create a sustainable future.
  5. Hara, N., Solomon, P., Kim, S. L., & Sonnenwald, D. H. (2003). An emerging view of scientific collaboration: Scientists' perspectives on collaboration and factors that impact collaboration. Journal of the American Society for Information science and Technology, 54(10), 952-965.
  6. Yokomichi, H., Mochizuki, M., & Yamagata, Z. (2021). Encouraging Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration and Innovation in Epidemiology in Japan. Frontiers in Public Health, 9, 285.
  7. Gruver, A. L., Hudson, L. L., & Sempowski, G. D. (2007). Immunosenescence of ageing. The Journal of Pathology: A Journal of the Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland, 211(2), 144-156.
  8. Caruso, C., Buffa, S., Candore, G., Colonna-Romano, G., Dunn-Walters, D., Kipling, D., & Pawelec, G. (2009). Mechanisms of immunosenescence. Immunity & Ageing, 6(1), 1-4.
  9. Goronzy, J. J., & Weyand, C. M. (2013). Understanding immunosenescence to improve responses to vaccines. Nature immunology, 14(5), 428-436.

Speaker(s):

  • Prof. Sten Lindahl, MD, PhD, FRCA, Chair Emeritus, Nobel Committee in Physiology or Medicine

Credits

  • 1.00 - Physician
  • 1.00 - Non-Physician

You must be logged in and own this session in order to post comments.

Peter Staats
10/1/21 1:06 pm

Wonderful presentation my friend

Paul Leo
10/1/21 1:26 pm

Thank you Professor!

Ricardo Vallejo
10/1/21 1:27 pm

Excellent presentation

Nicole Williams
10/1/21 1:39 pm

With a common goal and collaboration, anything can be achieved.

Kenneth Zahl
10/1/21 1:41 pm

nice talk

Marianna Zelenak
10/1/21 1:44 pm

Many good lessons present.

Corinne Basch
10/1/21 1:47 pm

I actually was fascinated by the history of the scientific progression, much of which I did not know

Konstantin Inozemtsev
10/1/21 1:49 pm

Global efforts to improve health are more important now than ever.

Donya Goodarzi
10/1/21 1:51 pm

I would try to be like him in keeping science sacred and experiment to keep it revived and promote my results globally.

George Johnston
10/1/21 1:52 pm

Interesting and good review of basic science.

Jennifer Kelly
10/1/21 1:54 pm

Hearing Prof. Lindhal present data in a non-biased way is helpful.

Confidence Francis
10/1/21 1:56 pm

The important lessen I learn is that team work and collaborative efforts is important.

Angie Rakes
10/1/21 2:00 pm

it was a great overview on Covid, age, inflammation and RNA

Michael Amster
10/1/21 2:01 pm

I learned a lot about mrna and vaccine technology

Rhonda Weiss
10/1/21 2:04 pm

It was excellent.

Suzie Allred
10/1/21 2:20 pm

In general, great information.